GMT NewYork London Moscow Tokyo Sydney

May

18

2017

5 Helpful Insights You Can Find Using Twitter Analytics

Published by in category analytics, Daily, Social Meda | Comments are closed

insights-twitter-analytics-compresed.jpg

When it launched in 2014, Twitter Analytics marked a solid (if long overdue) move towards greater transparency and measurement abilities for all users. And since then, Twitter has continued to make upgrades to the tool, most recently by creating a standalone analytics app called Engage, and launching analytics for Twitter Moments.

Though users now have more insight into their Twitter account metrics, they might not be using them to their full potential.

They’ve poked around the Twitter Analytics homepage and figured out they can track impressions and metrics by promoted or organic activity … and that’s about it.

The good news is there’s much more you can discover in your Tweet activity dashboard — you’ve just got to know where to look. Beyond the basic metrics, here are some incredibly important things you can discover about your Twitter account and audience using Tweet Analytics.

How to Use Twitter Analytics

You can access Twitter Analytics by tapping your profile and selecting “Analytics” from the dropdown menu:

twitter-analytics-1-4.png

1) See Which Content Resonates With Your Audience

Understanding which types of content and topics your audience members most enjoy can help drive your social marketing and content strategy. What’s the point in sharing content no one cares about or enjoys?

On the “Tweets” tab, you can see Impressions, Engagements and Engagement Rate (Engagements divided by Impressions) for each tweet, for paid and organic posts. Engagements include all activity on the tweet: retweets, follows, replies, favorites, and all clicks on the tweet, link, hashtag, etc.

twitter-analytics-tweet-activity.png

For a more granular view of the volume of each type of engagement, you can click on the specific tweet:

twitter-analytics-dashboard.png

Understanding which content items get the most engagement on Twitter is huge. If you can even commit 10 minutes a week to recording your top five or ten tweets by engagement so you can start seeing trends over time — and then applying those insights to future tweets — you’ll be able to better connect with your audience.

2) Understand How People Interact With Your Tweets Over Time

This is a really common question among social media marketers and brands: What made my tweet take off?

Some tools can analyze your Twitter followers and recommend the best day of the week for you to tweet. There’s also research out there showing when people are most likely to be active on Twitter. But of course, the best way to get to know your own audience is from your own account data.

On the Tweets dashboard, you can customize the date range you want to analyze to see when you published your highest-performing tweets:

twitter-analytics-change-over-time.png

twitter-analytics-dashboard-graphs.png

Twitter used to offer the ability to view a tweet’s engagement over the course of a day, and I think it was a mistake to remove that feature. I hope they bring it back in an update soon so users can analyze the best time of day to tweet from their account.

3) Get to Know Your Followers

Twitter’s audience data in the “Followers” tab contains a ton of valuable and useful insights. This is where you can really get to know the people who follow you.

You’ll find answers to questions like: Are your audience members more likely to be male or female? Which countries and cities are the majority from? What are their top interests? You can also see who your followers follow as well as your follower’s top five most unique interests. Answering these questions can help you better identify what content to create and share on Twitter — and when to share it.

twitter-analytics-demographics.png

You can also compare your Twitter followers to different segments — for example, to all Twitter users total:

twitter-analytics-follower-comparison.png

4) See Whether Your Follower Base Is Growing (or Shrinking)

I’d call myself a Twitter power user now, but it wasn’t always so. For several years, I slowly grew my following up to about 8,000 followers. In the past few years that I’ve really focused on my Twitter presence, I’ve picked up another 704,000.

Now, Twitter allows you to track your follower growth. Twitter Analytics shows you how many followers you had on any given day with the interactive timeline pictured below. Hovering over various points on the timeline will show you the exact follow count on that day. It spans back to the day your account was started.

twitter-analytics-follower-count.png

If you’re seeing blips in your follower count over time, it’s important to revisit your activity in those periods and see if you can learn from it. How often were you posting then — and what were you posting about? Were you taking the time to reply to folks, too? Answering questions like these can help you explain these blips — and avoid the same mistakes in the future.

5) Determine If Your Twitter Ads Are Worth the Money

I’ve been experimenting recently with paid promotions on Twitter. After reviewing my own data in Twitter Analytics, I realized my ads weren’t as effective as I thought they would be.

In the Tweets tab, right at the top, there’s a chart that gives an overview of your paid and organic tweet performance. Like other Twitter Analytics charts, this one is interactive, so hovering over specific parts will show you more precise numbers, as in the example below. Keep in mind that the data only goes back 91 days, so take advantage of the ability to export it regularly. You can make comparisons over longer periods of time in another program.

twitter-analytics-ad-impressions.png

I’m not spending a ton on paid promotions — around $100 a day when I use them — but at a glance, I can see that compared to organic posts, they’re not having a huge effect. If I were running specific promotions, I’d be interested in the Conversions information available in Twitter Analytics. But for getting more impressions on my content, it doesn’t seem worth it because I could get that exposure for free by just tweeting a few extra times per day.

Obviously, this will vary for every user, but this panel in Twitter Analytics is a pretty simple way to see what you need to make that decision.

Just below that chart, you can click “Promoted” to see all of your paid promotions in chronological order. This shows you how many engagements and impressions each one earned, helping you pinpoint which paid promotions are working (and which ones aren’t).

Exporting Data: How to Discover Even More Trends in Twitter Analytics

Twitter Analytics is great as an interactive dashboard for accessing increasingly granular data about your Twitter account performance.

The most useful feature I’ve found is the ability to export data from the Twitter API as a CSV file. Even power users with a ton of account activity can fairly quickly export their Analytics data.

To export your data, select the timeframe you’d like to use, and click the “Export Data” button in the top right corner of your Twitter Analytics Dashboard.

twitter-analytics-export-data.png

You can then sort through your exported data using Excel in ways not possible within the platform itself. For example, I extracted the time of day of my last 2500 tweets and plotted the tweet engagement rate vs. time of day, as shown here:

time-of-day-vs-engagement-rate

What I found was that the engagement rate (i.e. the # of engagements/impressions) held steady (on average) regardless of the time of day — possibly because I have a ton of international followers. It got me thinking that I really ought to be scheduling my content for all hours of the day, not just during business hours in my local time zone. Sure, fewer people will see my updates at 2 a.m. local time, but those who do are just as likely to engage with the content as those who see it during business hours.

There are so many other columns of data in the CSV export, including the number of favorites, retweets, link clicks, replies, URL clicks, follows, etc. So you can do this kind of customized analysis on whatever metrics you care most about.

Ultimately, the best data is your own, so make time to check out Twitter Analytics and see what you can learn and do with it. Figure out which tweets resonate and why. Then, work those insights into your social media marketing strategy for a more successful way forward. For more ideas, download HubSpot’s guide to getting more Twitter followers.

What are your must-know tips for using Twitter Analytics? Share with us in the comments below.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in January 2015 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

get inbound certified for free

Powered by WPeMatico

Oct

27

2016

Facebook Advertising Advice: 10 Tips From Experts at Trello, WeWork & More

facebook-ad-tips.jpg

Facebook started as a way for college classmates to communicate, and it’s since evolved into a hub for content creation, sharing, and advertising.

Over one billion active users engage on Facebook every day, which represents a tremendous opportunity for advertisers to leverage their content in front of potential customers.

The variety of targeting options available allow marketers to get the greatest value out of each ad dollar spent on this vast network, making it an ideal place to drive conversions, downloads, and lead generation. In fact, Social Media Examiner found that 55% of social media marketers use Facebook as their primary platform, and eMarketer learned that nearly 68% of all social media ad spending is on Facebook Ads. Download this free guide for data-backed tips on creating the optimal Facebook  Ad.

We decided to consult with a variety of successful social media marketers to learn more about their strategies for Facebook Ad targeting. Whether you’ve been advertising on Facebook for years or are just starting out, check out these lessons from the pros to maximize your social media advertising ROI.

10 Strategies for Facebook Advertising

1) Keep track of qualitative metrics.

Matt Diederichs, Social Marketing Lead at Hootsuite:

We focused on two metrics [in our Facebook Ads campaign] — video views and offer redemptions. Video views are primarily an efficiency spend, looking at the gross number of video views we can get for our investment, at the lowest possible CPV (cost per view). In the offer redemption area, we can go a bit deeper and also calculate our CPA (cost per acquisition) for each person who redeems the offer. These help us to understand whether it’s worth our investment to pay for direct customer acquisition.

Through all of this, we [also] look really hard at qualitative feedback. Facebook’s Reactions allow us to see not only how many people ‘like’ our content, but also when people ‘love’ or uh … [don’t] love our content. We also aspire for our content to be shareable, so we look for post shares and for comments on Ads. To us, that’s a leading indicator of content resonation.”

2) Take advantage of Facebook’s precise Ad targeting.

Shari Medini, Co-Host of the Push Pull Sales & Marketing Podcast:

You can target any audience [using Facebook Ads]. Almost everyone is on Facebook, and we all share incredible amounts of information about ourselves. Facebook compiles and organizes all of that data for their Ads platform so that marketers can go as broad or as narrow as they’d like. You want to target moms of young children in a 15-mile radius from a [children’s] clothing consignment store? Facebook lets you do that. You want to get young men in the sales profession between the ages of 30 and 35 to click through to your site? Facebook lets you do that.”

Andy Odom, Digital Marketing Director at Santander Consumer USA

Use the Audience Insights feature in your Ads Account to research all of Facebook, fans of your Page, or people in any custom audience to gain better insights into who they are and how to target them. You can upload [an email list] as a custom audience and serve special ads just to them.”

 Haidi Zhu, Head of Performance Marketing at WeWork:

[With Facebook Ads,] we start by analyzing the demographics of our current members to better understand who they are based on location, interests, industry, and more. We use this data to develop audiences to identify potential members and further segment down to deliver ads that feature the WeWork offerings, locations, and services that we strongly believe will benefit them most.”

3) Test different creative assets for best results.

Frank Emanuele, Co-Host of The Marketers Next Door Podcast:

Always A/B test your creative [assets]. It’s easy to think you know what will capture your audience’s attention, but you’ll be surprised when you actually test it. I always compare at least two options and track their performance carefully. Then I put my spend toward the top performer to get the most bang for my buck. I often find that the creative I liked best actually isn’t my top performer.”

4) Pay attention to what visitors do after they click.

Alicia Palmieri, Senior Social Media & Content Specialist at 2U:

2U uses the “Learn More” call-to-action because it performs well with the type of thought leadership [education] content we share.

Our end goal when advertising on Facebook is to get people to view longform, data-rich content. Since we host most of this on our website, we work with our web analytics team to track behavior of people coming from our Ads. This helps us ensure that we’re targeting the right people and providing engaging content that they will enjoy.”

5) Don’t force new trends into your Ad strategy.

 Rachael Samuels, Social Media Specialist at Sprout Social:  

It’s important to have a clear objective for your ads, clear KPIs and a desired cost-per-conversion. Identifying these metrics, setting up proper tracking and keeping a pulse on performance is key to determining ROI from social advertising.”

Aaron Moreno, Digital Advertising Specialist at Sprout Social:  

The social landscape is constantly evolving, and our social team is constantly adapting to meet the needs of our community and stay authentic in our social presence. It’s great to be aware of trends, but you shouldn’t force a trend or new network if it’s not the right fit for your brand. You have to determine a trend’s genuine value offer before diving in headfirst. If something isn’t resonating with your audience, there’s no reason to continue chasing the hype just to be seen doing it — your audience could see that as a major turnoff.”

Chelsea Hunersen, Social Media Manager at HubSpot:

The principles of creating a good post and grabbing attention are the same no matter what the medium. For example, providing clear value and connecting about [your audience’s] real needs is something I always try to do. I’m less concerned about using a new medium like video or canvas just to use it, but I will try it if the technology gives us a better way to reach our audience.”

6) Find inspiration from your competition.

Rebecca White, Community Manager at TrackMaven:

Being able to tell what your competitors are promoting on social is invaluable. Comparing our Facebook spend with that of our competitors gives us a level playing field on which to evaluate the impact of our content.”

7) Publish videos that are short and sweet.

Erica Moss, Community Manager at Trello:

Because [Facebook offers] such a small amount of real estate, it’s important to get to the point quickly with one specific call-to-action, whether it’s a discount to redeem, an event to attend or a prompt to learn more about your product or service. Avoid lofty or flowery language.

When considering images, faces and bright colors pop more (high-res only), and video can be super impactful for ads when kept to 30 seconds or less. Bonus points if your video has closed captioning so that users don’t need audio to consume your message.”

8) Don’t fixate on vanity metrics alone.

Jenna Dutcher, Content Marketing Manager at Localist.com:

Facebook Ads can be a valuable tool, but only if you put effort into actually optimizing and measuring them. We’re big fans of A/B testing here at Localist, and always have at least two iterations of an ad running, sometimes 10-20 versions, where we’ll test things as small as capitalization, imagery, headlines, and CTAs.

You also need to be mindful of what you’re measuring. Success can’t just be based on how many people click or view an ad — what does 500 clickthroughs to a post mean to you and your company?  Be sure to tie superficial metrics like this to an acquisition goal or metric that you actually value, like cost-per-download or cost-per-lead.

9) Focus on the mobile experience.

Jason Myers, Social Media Manager at The Content Factory:

Try composing, or at least previewing, your Ad on a mobile device. Most people view Ads on a phone screen which is why those with stark, text-free images and simple messages get more engagement.”

10) Experiment with video.

Ben Kessler, Director of Marketing at WeWork

We are always eager to test new products and the latest betas to innovate with our marketing. This includes 360” video, renderings, and more, all developed by our in-house team. Because WeWork is truly something you need to experience in person, we’ve seen a lot of success with video to convey our brand and message within Facebook.”

Learn From the Pros

Now that you’ve learned different strategies for successful Facebook Advertising, apply them to your next campaign. A common thread among the responses we received for this article was the importance of constantly testing and evaluating results.

Don’t hesitate to change tactics midway through a campaign to drive greater value and conversions from your Ads. If you’re unsure where to begin with launching an Ads campaign, we have a step-by-step guide to start you off on the right foot.

What advice would you give for Facebook Advertising best practices? Share with us in the comments below.

free guide to facebook advertising

Oct

4

2016

How to Get Verified on Twitter [Infographic]

twitter-8.jpg

What do Anna Kendrick, Serena Williams, and Dharmesh Shah all have in common?

Aside from the fact that you can hear from all three at INBOUND 2016, each of these people has a verified account on Twitter. You know, the little blue checkmark? That blue “verified” badge indicates to Twitter users that the individual or organization is authentic and that their content is of wide public interest.

Up until recently, Twitter handed out verified checkmarks to the accounts of prominent athletes, actors, businesspeople, musicians, politicians, authors, journalists, and academics. However, as of July, Twitter has opened up an application process so anyone on Twitter can apply to become verified.

What’s in it for you? Well, verifying your Twitter account could result in greater success on the platform, as it offers users more insight into their analytics and provides more options for engaging with followers. To learn more about the application process, check out the infographic below from the folks at SurePayroll.



verified-twitter-03.jpg 


free guide: science of twitter success

Sep

28

2016

How to Use Snapchat for Business: A Guide for Marketers [Free Ebook]

snapchat-business.gif

It used to be easy for marketers to write off Snapchat with its ephemeral social messaging and wacky selfie filters as a silly mobile app. 

But the tool has quickly become the social media darling of the marketing world, leading advertisers to rethink their decision to overlook the platform — in large part because of its rapid growth. According to Bloomberg, the app has more than 60 million daily active users in the U.S. and Canada, and people watch more than 10 billion videos per day

These numbers are appealing to marketers, but Snapchat’s focus on video, the various shortcuts, and its lack of a traditional “feed” makes getting started intimidating. What’s the difference between a Story and a snap? How do you interact with followers? And how do you measure results? 

To demystify Snapchat and how building a presence on the app could benefit your brand, we created aonline guide — The Marketer’s Guide to Using Snapchat for Business.

Check it out here to learn:

  • How to build a following 
  • The best types of content to post
  • The little-known tricks that’ll make you a master at sending snaps

Download your copy of The Marketer’s Guide to Using Snapchat for Business

Snapchat for Business  

Sep

27

2016

How to Build a Social Media Army

ThinkstockPhotos-518414242-782417-edited.jpgThe superheroes in Marvel Comics’ Avengers series often join forces, commonly in some sort of shiny form-fitting clothing, to defend the weak and powerless. Whether it was Thor’s bulging biceps, Ironman’s impressive armour or the Hulk’s super strength – at some point or another, I’m sure that something about this bunch has probably caught your attention.

Typically, the road to beating the baddies is generally an uphill one. Even superheroes need to hone their super powers, overcome a few hurdles, plot their defence and ultimately work together to save the world.

While your social media strategy may not call for the same techniques required to defeat a super villain, marketers can learn a thing or two from the Avengers. Here are a few ways that social media marketers can embrace their inner superhero and build their own social media army.

Training your team

It takes a lot of hard work to be the best. Ensuring that your staff understand the value of digital/inbound marketing and social media is all about training. If they don’t understand what social media and inbound marketing can do for the business, chances are that they won’t do it very effectively.

Conducting workshops and teaching your team about the importance of this content is a social media management essential. Part of this training should focus on teaching staff about your business model, all the ins and outs of the product, your content strategy and how best to engage with customers.

Working together

While each of the Avengers is a superhero in their own right, the real magic happens when they come together. Harnessing the power of collaboration is all about encouraging your staff to work together to complete tasks themselves, rather than outsourcing work to others.

Content is a great way to do so. Before paying other writers to author blogs, why not motivate your staff to try their hand at writing content. Not only will this add to their digital/inbound knowledge, but it also allows them to put all of the knowledge they gained during their training to good use.

The best offense is a good defense

Defending the free world is a prerequisite on any superhero’s day planner. As a marketer, your aim should be to defend yourself against employee fatigue. By creating a solid content plan, an organised social media planning calendar, spreading the responsibilities for creating content and posting that content, you will eliminate irregularity and ensure consistency across all social accounts.

And why is consistency so important? Not only does it give your business a distinct identity, it also differentiates your business from your competitors, ensures your message stands out in customer’s minds and increases customer loyalty.

Changing your strategy

It’s generally around the middle of the movie that the good guys hit a stumbling block. At this point they usually do a little soul searching and realise that defeating their foes may require them to rethink their game plan.

Where the marketers of old were focused on hard selling, they now need to be thinking about hard content. From blogs and emails to white papers and eBooks, providing useful content is one of the best ways to target customers at any stage of their buying journey.

The key with this content is to provide customers with a compelling enough value proposition so that they are willing to give you their contact information. The idea behind premium content is to market the information as “exclusive” and to convince them that the content has a higher value.

Social media provides a great platform to promote this content and to focus your strategy on getting visitors back to your own website to begin their journey with your business. Get this strategy right and you will have a solid lead generation system that’s future proof.

Making the most of tech

Speaking of content, and sharing this content, technology provides marketers with a great opportunity to promote their content to the masses. Would Thor have the same oomph without his hammer? And what would Iron Man really be able to achieve without his armour? Sure, they’d all still be superheroes but their gadgets make their jobs a whole bunch easier. Marketers should think about social media in the same way.

Using marketing software can enable you to post content on behalf of your whole team. This helps to avoid a big issue for marketers and sales teams alike. Internal email asking everyone to help and share can often be hard to make stick and often only 5% support without more follow ups and aggressive KPIs.

All of this costs time, leads and sales.  Software can help you remove this and if you’ve got a team of 40 for example sharing instantly straight from your marketing department, you’ve just built a social media army and a force to be reckoned with.

At the end of the day, it’s through the efforts of a great team that success is achieved. Whether you’re a social media marketer or a superhero, the principles are the same – if your team know what they need to do, if your attack is well organised and if you’re using the resources you have at your disposal, it’s only a matter of time before you overcome your adversaries.  

Are you keen to build a social army and take your social media management to superhero heights, download our Ultimate Guide to Social Media.

New Call-to-action

Apr

20

2016

Snapchat is Growing Up

ThinkstockPhotos-503712028-742067-edited.jpg Whether or not you use it, we’ve all heard of Snapchat. And regardless of your preconceived notions about it, this photo/video sharing app has quickly become popular with adults over the last year, making it a serious contender in the social media world. Snapchat is no longer just for teens, but for moms too! So how can marketers take advantage of this increasingly mainstream tool?

The Scoop on Snapchat

When it was initially released in 2011, Snapchat was an instant favorite among teenagers, largely due to the fact that content would disappear after being viewable for only a brief amount of time.

Basically, you communicate in real time by taking a picture or short video (called a “snap”), adding a quick caption, and sending it to people who are connected to your Snapchat account. The snap is available for viewing for only a few seconds after it is opened and then it disappears.

You can also create a “story”, which strings all your snaps together and allows them to be viewed by any of your Snapchat connections for 24 hours. To connect with someone on Snapchat outside of your phone contacts, you have to look them up by their username, Snapcode or QR code.

Snapchat Doesn’t Keep Score

Snapchat is stripped down social media and is all about living in the moment and sharing authentic experiences.Their photo effects aren’t made to give a “professional” look to your images, like on Instagram. There’s no editing, like on Facebook. There’s no popularity contest for who has the most Snapchat friends. There’s no keeping score. Period.

Life on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, for example, tends to be more about the rush of scoring likes and comments. Many Instagram and Facebook users even view these things as a barometer of popularity and self-worth. Many users will create content designed for the sole purpose of collecting “likes”, and delete posts that haven’t drawn enough attention.

Those who follow you on Snapchat can view your snaps and stories, but there’s no option to “like”, comment, or share them. That takes a tremendous amount of pressure off of users to create content that will receive a lot of “likes” versus creating content that is authentic. Society in general could take a cue from Snapchat’s stripped down approach. Marketers should follow this same philosophy in creating authentic content and not just focusing on the popular vote.

Discover – Marketing on Snapchat

Unlike Facebook, you can’t pay for ads to pop up on a news feed in Snapchat, because there is no news feed. If you want to see what someone is up to, you have to follow them. Which means that anyone following you actually cares about what you have to say.

Snapchat’s current large scale marketing opportunities appear in the form of an online magazine layout in the Discover channel feature. Discover channels allow select publishers to have a permanent place on Snapchat where they can post content from various sources, use a mix of text and photos, and long or short form videos. These publishers can then include some advertising snaps in the middle of their stories.

When this feature launched a year ago, there were only eleven channel partners (CNN, Comedy Central, Cosmopolitan, Daily Mail, ESPN, Food Network, National Geographic, People, Vice, Yahoo News and Warner Music). That number has now more than doubled to twenty-one channels, and will no doubt continue to grow.

While Discover partners is an exclusive club limited to high-traffic media companies, all marketers should take note on the creative concepts being used on these channels. Any person or business can create a SnapChat account (like Audi, GrubHub< and even the White House), but you need to generate creative and interesting content in order to gain more followers. Your audience may not yet be as broad as it is on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook, but you will know they are genuinely interested in what you have to say.

How Do You Get Started on Snapchat?

Signing-up for a Snapchat account is not much different from setting up any other social media account. You’ll need to provide an email address and birthdate for your company (make it over 18 so you don’t end up classified as a child). You’ll be asked for a phone number, but you can skip over that.

Be sure to keep all of your social media branding in sync so that users can easily find you across all of the social channels. 20th Century Fox is an example of what NOT to do when setting up your SnapChat account. If you went to look them up on Snapchat as “20thcenturyfox”, which is how they are listed on Twitter, you wouldn’t get a match. No suggestions will appear at all. That’s because their Snapchat account is FoxMovies. So if your business is already listed as ClearPivot on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, then it’s wise to also use the ClearPivot name on Snapchat.

What Should You Post?

After you setup your Snapchat account, practice posting some snaps to get used to capturing experiences while you’re in the moment. Remember, Snapchat users like authentic content and the interaction is all about sharing experiences. Also, be sure to post often since content disappears after a brief amount of time.

If you really want to increase the human connection between the company and its audience, have one employee take over the company Snapchat account every day and make a story about their day. Having a different employee do this every day will show the personalities of the people behind the company, and further strengthen your relationship with your Snapchat connections.

Tidbits for Specific Industries

Cosmetic Companies

Snapchat has a very useful timelapse and fast forward feature, which would be great for how-to stories. This would be a very effective way to showcase a new product and how to best use it. Also, every makeup wearing woman loves tips on how to apply makeup like the pros. You could have a different story everyday on how to properly apply lip liner, mascara, brow liner, eye shadow etc. Stories on how best to store, care for, and replace makeup would a hit as well.

Hardware or Craft Stores

Customers of these businesses tend to be do-it-yourselfers, so what better way to connect with these users than with a DIY story. Home improvement stories can range from large construction projects, like building a deck, landscaping, or finishing your basement, to smaller projects such as replacing a light switch, installing cabinet hardware, or which light bulbs are the most energy efficient. Craft DIY stories can also have a variety ranging from quilting to scrapbooking, or anything in between. The sky’s the limit with DIY stories.

Local Coffee Shops/Bars/Boutiques

These types of businesses tend to host frequent events that appeal to those within their community. Wouldn’t it be great to post live snaps from the event to draw more interest from those who perhaps didn’t know about it or forgot to mark the event on their calendar? Since these businesses are local, a user could see your snap from the event and drop in to check it out before the fun ends.

Don’t Miss Out on the Next “Big One”

The full marketing potential of Snapchat remains widely untapped. That could change very quickly this year. Gary Vaynerchuk declared that 2016 is the year for Snapchat:

“…if you’re running a business in 2016, you need to be thinking about Snapchat as a channel to grow your customer base. Period… I haven’t seen this much consumer attention on one social platform since early 2007 and 2008 with Twitter.”

The millennial generation makes up the majority of the workforce in America and are quickly taking over the world of business. They are increasingly not tuning in to traditional media like broadcast TV and print newspapers.. The most effective resource to reach this prime target audience is through social media, and more importantly right now – Snapchat!

Free E-Book: Social Media for Business. Download Now.

May

19

2015

Facebook Instant Articles: Bad for Marketers, OK for Publishers, but Great for Facebook

facebook-instant-articles.png

When Facebook recently launched Instant Articles, the internet and publishing community was buzzing.

Publishers were excited — by hosting their own articles within Facebook but still displaying their own ads, they could generate more traffic and attention from the Facebook community. Users were also excited — Instant Articles are much faster and more interactive than typical mobile websites.

And with the buzz came many important questions for marketers.

Are Instant Articles going to kill websites? No. Are publishers and marketers making a mistake leveraging Instant Articles? Maybe.

Here’s why.

Smart Move for Facebook

As a user, the experience of Facebook Instant Articles is great. You can get to the story you want almost instantly. Compared to the app’s built-in web browser, Facebook Instant Articles are a major speed and experience upgrade. I can quickly read an article, get right back into my feed, and move on to the next update.

Facebook is brilliant. They understand that a great content consumption experience is critical to their users staying engaged on their platform. 

We’ve seen this most recently in Facebook’s approach to video. Recent data suggests Facebook is gaining ground on YouTube as the video consumption destination on the internet. And with 1.25 billion mobile monthly active users, it’s only logical for Facebook to take the same approach with mobile text content consumption. Instant Articles give users a better experience while keeping them contained within the Facebook mobile application. Well played, Facebook.

What This Means for Marketers and Publishers

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that many of the major publishers are getting 60% of their referral traffic from Facebook.

That previous sentence contained one very important word: “referral.” These publishers aren’t getting 60% of their entire web traffic from Facebook — Facebook is only driving 60% of the clicks from links back to publishers’ sites. That is a very important point to understand. Referral traffic is only one source of traffic to a website or blog — and it’s a small one.

In fact, a study by Conductor of 30 websites’ traffic distribution found that 64% of website traffic comes from search engines. Referral and social traffic? It drives just 17% of traffic. This puts referral traffic in the minority of traffic sources.

Facebook’s pitch is that publishers will get better engagement with Instant Articles — and this very well might be true. It’s also likely that publishers will get additional dark social traffic from Facebook’s messaging application as well as email. However, this traffic could come at an expense.

When a publisher or marketer hosts an article on their own website, any inbound links from other sites that mentioned that article link directly to their own website. This passes authority in Google’s search algorithm, which helps drive more search traffic to the article over the long-term.

With Facebook Instant Articles, sharing and linking is contained within Facebook itself. Publishers and marketers could run the risk of getting fewer inbound links back to their own websites, which ultimately means they could be trading additional Facebook traffic for less search traffic.

Is this a good trade?

When you make a deal with Facebook, you give up control. When you give up control, you give up the ability to predictably drive growth and revenue — which is exactly what marketers aim to do. Through their website, blog, and other marketing assets, marketers work to drive conversions and properly educate potential customers. By using Instant Articles, marketers and publishers aren’t just giving up control of their distribution over to Facebook — they are also giving control of their audience over to Facebook.

Just take a look at The New York Times‘ first Instant Article to see what I mean. 

ny_times_instant_article.png

One thing that is immediately apparent about this Instant Article is that it is missing the same navigation that the article has on The New York Times’ website. When viewing the article on The New York Times’ site on mobile or desktop, a user can access the navigation to read other stories, search for a specific article, and see other articles that are currently popular.

On the Instant Article version, The New York Times site navigation is replaced by the option to follow The New York Times on Facebook. And at the very end of the article, there are three other articles from The New York Times — a smaller and different selection than is offered on The New York Times mobile website.

This lack of control goes against the basic tenets of inbound marketing. In this case, The New York Times published an article that attracted readers to it, but instead of being rewarded for having great content by having the reader continue to consume additional content on their site, the reader is most likely going to go back into Facebook and read a different Instant Article from a different site.

Facebook Instant Articles make the publisher of the content less relevant. The focus is on the individual article much more than it is the publication behind that article. Does the potential distribution increase of Instant Articles offset the brand dilution for publishers?

The odd person out in the rollout of Instant Articles is the marketer. The trade-off of control for traffic might work for many publishers, but not marketers. Publishers have a different business model for their content. Because they monetize based on volume of attention to their content, Facebook Instant Articles have the potential to help them make more advertising revenue.

This is very different than marketers — they need to not only attract the attention of a potential buyer, but also convert and nurture that person through the buying process. For a marketer’s core goal, Instant Articles detract instead of enable.

And we’ve all seen this movie before. Business of all types scrambled to build, maintain, and grow a Facebook Page — many even believed it would replace their website. Then, Facebook changed their News Feed algorithm again and again to make it more difficult for those same businesses to reach the fans that they worked so hard to attract. Who’s to say that the same thing won’t happen with Instant Articles?

We have long said on this blog that marketers today need to think and act like publishers. If this is really true, should marketers begin fighting to have their blog being distributed to Instant Articles? No. Should marketers give up optimizing their own blog for search and instead just optimize posts for Facebook Instant Articles? No. Maintaining control of your content is key to driving long-term, sustainable business growth.

Image Credit: Facebook

free social media benchmarks report

Feb

28

2015

New European Social Media Benchmarks: How Does Your Company Stack Up?

European social media stats

Do you spend hours reporting on your monthly marketing activities, but are not really sure how you’re performing among your industry peers? Do you find it difficult to find social media stats related to your industry? Are you currently developing or revisiting your social media strategy, and unsure of how many times you should post or what to include in your posts?

If you share any of these uncertainties or challenges, you’re not alone — many other marketers also worry about the performance of their social media accounts. European marketers, in particular, often find it especially frustrating when searching for industry-relevant benchmark data.

That’s why we decided to take a close look at our customer data and compile top industry trends for European marketers in one, easy-to-reference place. Check out this website to quickly learn how your peers are performing on social media. Here’s a snapshot of some of the benchmark data you can expect to find there:

  • The average number of social media posts posted by B2C companies in 2014 was 1,114 — that’s 22 social media posts per week! [twitter-logoTweet This]
  • A typical social media post published by companies in the non-profit/education industry in 2014 got, on average, 6 interactions per post. [twitter-logoTweet This]
  • Most social media posts posted by companies in the marketing industry in 2014 included links — 9 in 10 posts to be exact! [twitter-logoTweet This]

Want more European social media benchmark data for your industry? Click here to get more social media benchmarks. And don’t forget to share this resource with your friends and colleagues using the click-to-tweet links below.

twitter-logo Click to Tweet: 

 “European marketers! It’s time to benchmark your social media activity >> http://hubs.ly/y0yn930 via @HubSpot

European Social Media Benchmark Statistics 

free social media benchmarks report

Feb

18

2015

How to Set Up Multi-Product Ads on Facebook [Quick Tip]

facebook-MPA

In June of last year, Facebook announced a new ad format called “multi-product ads” that caught the attention of many Facebook advertisers. This new format was designed to do three things: generate more website visitors, drive better conversion rates, and improve remarketing results. 

Quick movers were able to make the most of the new ad format using the Facebook Ads API, but others had to wait for Facebook to fully incorporate the format into its advertising product. Last week, Facebook started to do just that, making multi-product ads easily available to some advertisers in the Power Editor. 

If you’re one of those lucky advertisers or simply want to be prepared for when it gets rolled out to your ad interface, keep on reading. We’ll walk you through exactly what multi-product ads are, how to set them up, and how you make use them in your marketing.

What Are Multi-Product Ads?

This new ad format allows up to three items in the same ad unit — which is referred to as a “carousel.” This carousel appears below a typical-looking status update, and each item within the carousel has its own title, description, and destination link.

This solution may sound as if it’s specifically for ecommerce, but Facebook advertising evangelist Jon Loomer has used it to promote his Facebook advertising blog, and we’re also trialing it for our ebooks. Here’s an example of what it looks like:

FacebookMultiProductAd-egs

How Do You Create Multi-Product Ads?

Want to set up your very own multi-product ad? Follow these steps.

1) Log in to Power Editor.

2) Create a basic ad the way you normally would, choosing “Clicks to website” or “Website conversions” as the campaign objective.

3) In the “Create Ad” section, select “Multiple images and links in one ad.” 

Note: if you don’t see this option, you have not been granted access to this ad unit yet.

How_To_Set_Up_Facebook_Multi-Product_Ads__Quick_Tip__-_Google_Docs4) Complete all fields for each of the three ads you’d like to include in your carousel, including a destination URL, headline, product description, and an image.

Tip: Click on the numbered panels to navigate between items.

Setting_up_multi-product_ads_on__Face

5) If you want Facebook to determine the best order to show your ads in, check “Automatically select and order images and links.”

This ensures that the item that is receiving most engagement always shows first.

6) Under “See More URL” enter the destination URL for final panel in your ad.

For example, if you were displaying ebooks on the topic of social media, your “See More URL” could be a page displaying all your social media-related ebooks.

7) Under “See More Display URL,” enter the See More URL you want to show in the ad.

Facebook-MultiProduct-Ads_Seemore

8) If you are using any custom tracking tags or parameters, enter those in the “Tracking” section.

tracking_pixel_multiproduct_ads

9) Click “Upload Changes” on the top navigation to save your new ad.

How Can You Make the Most of Multi-Product Ads?

Early results and case studies have suggested that Multi-Product Ads are leading to above-average clickthrough rates and below average cost per click. For example, ecommerce company Nomorerack used Multi-Product Ads and saw its clickthrough rates increase as much as 42% and its cost per acquisition decrease between 42% and 45%. 

But how can you make the most of this new ad format? How can you use multi-product ads to generate leads for your business?

There are a number of options when it comes to retargeting using multi-product ads. Here are a two get you started:

  1. Combine multi-product ads with Custom Audiences. This allows you to do a number of things, including retargeting to people who didn’t make a purchase with similar products to what they showed interest in.
  2. Showcase your top three best sellers. This could increase your chances of getting clickthroughs. Try targeting these at Lookalike Audiences of people who have converted or simply people who fall within the parameters of your target customer base.  

Remember, the early bird catches the worm when it comes to new ad units. Don’t wait for other people to try and test them — do it yourself!

Stay tuned: Yesterday Facebook also launched dynamic product ads, which will allow advertisers to upload entire product catalogues to Facebook. In turn, Facebook will then generate ads for the advertisers (in the multi-product ad format), much like Google’s Product Listing Ads. Facebook will also recognise when products are out of stock, and stop showing ads. These ad units have not been rolled out in Power Editor just yet, but they sure do look like a game-changer for retailers.

Have you tried these new ad units yet? In the comments below, let us know how they are working for you.

learn how to double your lead flow in 30 days

Feb

18

2015

How to Set Up Multi-Product Ads on Facebook [Quick Tip]

facebook-MPA

In June of last year, Facebook announced a new ad format called “multi-product ads” that caught the attention of many Facebook advertisers. This new format was designed to do three things: generate more website visitors, drive better conversion rates, and improve remarketing results. 

Quick movers were able to make the most of the new ad format using the Facebook Ads API, but others had to wait for Facebook to fully incorporate the format into its advertising product. Last week, Facebook started to do just that, making multi-product ads easily available to some advertisers in the Power Editor. 

If you’re one of those lucky advertisers or simply want to be prepared for when it gets rolled out to your ad interface, keep on reading. We’ll walk you through exactly what multi-product ads are, how to set them up, and how you make use them in your marketing.

What Are Multi-Product Ads?

This new ad format allows up to three items in the same ad unit — which is referred to as a “carousel.” This carousel appears below a typical-looking status update, and each item within the carousel has its own title, description, and destination link.

This solution may sound as if it’s specifically for ecommerce, but Facebook advertising evangelist Jon Loomer has used it to promote his Facebook advertising blog, and we’re also trialing it for our ebooks. Here’s an example of what it looks like:

FacebookMultiProductAd-egs

How Do You Create Multi-Product Ads?

Want to set up your very own multi-product ad? Follow these steps.

1) Log in to Power Editor.

2) Create a basic ad the way you normally would, choosing “Clicks to website” or “Website conversions” as the campaign objective.

3) In the “Create Ad” section, select “Multiple images and links in one ad.” 

Note: if you don’t see this option, you have not been granted access to this ad unit yet.

How_To_Set_Up_Facebook_Multi-Product_Ads__Quick_Tip__-_Google_Docs4) Complete all fields for each of the three ads you’d like to include in your carousel, including a destination URL, headline, product description, and an image.

Tip: Click on the numbered panels to navigate between items.

Setting_up_multi-product_ads_on__Face

5) If you want Facebook to determine the best order to show your ads in, check “Automatically select and order images and links.”

This ensures that the item that is receiving most engagement always shows first.

6) Under “See More URL” enter the destination URL for final panel in your ad.

For example, if you were displaying ebooks on the topic of social media, your “See More URL” could be a page displaying all your social media-related ebooks.

7) Under “See More Display URL,” enter the See More URL you want to show in the ad.

Facebook-MultiProduct-Ads_Seemore

8) If you are using any custom tracking tags or parameters, enter those in the “Tracking” section.

tracking_pixel_multiproduct_ads

9) Click “Upload Changes” on the top navigation to save your new ad.

How Can You Make the Most of Multi-Product Ads?

Early results and case studies have suggested that Multi-Product Ads are leading to above-average clickthrough rates and below average cost per click. For example, ecommerce company Nomorerack used Multi-Product Ads and saw its clickthrough rates increase as much as 42% and its cost per acquisition decrease between 42% and 45%. 

But how can you make the most of this new ad format? How can you use multi-product ads to generate leads for your business?

There are a number of options when it comes to retargeting using multi-product ads. Here are a two get you started:

  1. Combine multi-product ads with Custom Audiences. This allows you to do a number of things, including retargeting to people who didn’t make a purchase with similar products to what they showed interest in.
  2. Showcase your top three best sellers. This could increase your chances of getting clickthroughs. Try targeting these at Lookalike Audiences of people who have converted or simply people who fall within the parameters of your target customer base.  

Remember, the early bird catches the worm when it comes to new ad units. Don’t wait for other people to try and test them — do it yourself!

Stay tuned: Yesterday Facebook also launched dynamic product ads, which will allow advertisers to upload entire product catalogues to Facebook. In turn, Facebook will then generate ads for the advertisers (in the multi-product ad format), much like Google’s Product Listing Ads. Facebook will also recognise when products are out of stock, and stop showing ads. These ad units have not been rolled out in Power Editor just yet, but they sure do look like a game-changer for retailers.

Have you tried these new ad units yet? In the comments below, let us know how they are working for you.

learn how to double your lead flow in 30 days

Feb

2

2015

New Data: What Types of Content Perform Best on Social Media?

social-content-data

In many aspects of life, timing is key. If you’ve got to schedule a very important meeting, and all of the attendees aren’t morning people, scheduling an 8 a.m. start time probably won’t result in a productive meeting. Or maybe you want to book a cheap vacation — you probably want to avoid scheduling one during the holidays. 

The same is true with content creation and social media. If you want your content to do well on social media, you’ve got to be strategic about what you publish and when you publish it. To figure out how and when to publish content to have a big social media splash, Fractl recently partnered with BuzzStream to analyze 220,000 articles from 11 verticals published during June 2014 to November 2014. Check out our findings below.

What types of content get shared?

Great ideas lead to great content, and our research proves that how you choose to execute that content will affect its social traction. We divided the content of articles into five types: how-tos, lists, what-posts, why-posts, and videos. Here’s how we defined each post type:

  • How-to posts introduce a problem, offer a solution, and then discuss each step to reach the desired result.
  • Lists are exactly what they sound like — they focus on a particular topic, offer a number of points about the topic, and provide a brief conclusion.
  • What-posts provide further information on a specific topic, with many articles surrounding comparisons of one thing to another.
  • Why-posts typically provide readers with a reason or purpose and provide details that support a focused conclusion.
  • Videos are also self-explanatory, providing the audience with a dynamic visual of the topic discussed within the article.

Across the six-month period of this analysis, we found that some post types did perform better than others. Lists and why-posts proved to have the most reliable social traction, averaging around 21,000 shares per month with a variance of less than 2.5%. What-posts were the riskiest format, showing a high variance of 13.45%. Further analysis of the six-month period revealed:

  • Lists narrowly claimed the most social traction at 22.45%
  • Why-posts earned 22.32% of social traction.
  • Videos drew 18.94% of total shares and performed well in Q4.
  • How-to articles earned 18.42% of shares.
  • What-posts had the lowest social traction, earning 17.88% of total shares.

What types of content perform best for different industries?

The social metrics of content type also varied by vertical, proving that each audience has different preferences and behaviors.

For example, lists proved the best content type for the travel vertical, claiming 32% of shares. The list format corresponded with what people do when planning for a trip: Write down where they want to go, what they need to pack, and other details.

But lists didn’t do as well in the education vertical, where this post type claimed only 10% of shares. Other interesting insights we found were:

  • Technology social shares increased during the end of the year, when its audience searched online for the latest gadgets to complete their holiday shopping.
  • July is the lowest-performing month for the education vertical, claiming only 10.57% of total shares, as school is closed for the summer and people’s minds are on other matters.
  • How-to articles were the most consistent performers within the automotive audience, corresponding with the highly practical and technical nature of the subject matter.
  • How-to posts also performed best in the food vertical, comprising of 37% of the social shares, most likely because people tend to enjoy posts on recipes. 

We also decided to dive deeper into the 11 verticals and identify the top 20 websites in each. Filtering these results by content type and date, we saw that although the average number of social shares per vertical did not vary wildly — usually less than 10% each month — some verticals performed better than others. The news vertical saw the most social traction, averaging more than 28,000 shares each month. Its high performance is likely because it has the broadest topic range of the different verticals. The second highest-performing vertical, entertainment, averaged more than 17,000 shares a month, while travel rounded out the top three with an average of more than 10,000 shares. Other findings included:

  • Lifestyle, tech, finance, business, and education averaged between 5,000 and 9,000 shares — nearly three times less than the news vertical.
  • Business was the only vertical to have a single-digit variance for all content types, emphasizing that its readers have a consistent sharing habit.
  • Automotive, health, and food averaged between 2,000 and 5,000 shares, food being the lowest-performing vertical with fewer than 2,500 social shares a month.
  • News was the only vertical that saw specific content types pass 5,000 shares.

When’s the best season for shareable content?

With more than 128,000 shares, October emerged as the month with the highest social traction for each of the different content types. Further analysis found:

  • Why-posts did well in September and November.
  • Videos performed well in Q4.
  • How-to posts took off in August and November.
  • What-posts earned the most shares out of all content types in October.
  • Videos did best in September with more than 24,000 shares.

But that doesn’t mean you should saturate publishing come fall. A closer look at the data determined that different verticals perform better at different times throughout the year:

  • News was the only vertical to see three content types reach more than 2,500 shares each in June.
  • None of the five content types reached 6,000 shares in any vertical during July and August.
  • Business, health, tech, and food did not have any standout content type that earned more than 2,000 social shares in September.
  • Automotive earned most of its shares in July, specifically with what-posts exceeding 3,000 social shares.
  • Social traction in the business vertical remained consistent for five months, between 8,000 and 9,000 shares, before dropping in November.
  • Lifestyle saw its highest monthly shares in September, with what-posts performing the best on social.
  • Finance also saw its highest monthly shares in September, with list posts providing the highest social traction.

The biggest takeaway from our research? Timing and relevancy key, especially if you want to hit that ever-desired mark of “going viral.” 

If you want to dive further into our findings, please check out the infographic below. If you want to put these findings to use, check out our free social content calendar.

Social Content Calendar

Study by Fractl and BuzzStream.

free social media benchmarks report

Jan

7

2015

5 Essential Insights You Can Uncover Using Twitter Analytics

twitter-analytics

When it launched last year, Twitter Analytics marked a solid (if long overdue) move towards greater transparency and measurement abilities for users. And since then, Twitter has continued to make upgrades to the tool, most recently by adding analytics access in its mobile app.

Though users now have more insight into their Twitter account metrics, many aren’t using them to their full potential. They’ve poked around the Twitter Analytics Dashboard and figured out they can track impressions and metrics by promoted or organic activity … and that’s about it. 

The good news is there’s much more you can discover in your Tweet Dashboard — you’ve just got to know where to look. Beyond the basic metrics, here are some incredibly important things you can discover about your Twitter account and audience using Tweet Analytics. 

1) See Which Content Resonates With Your Audience

Understanding which types of content and topics your audience members most enjoy can help drive your social marketing and content strategy. What’s the point in sharing content no one cares about or enjoys?

In the “Tweets” tab, you can see Impressions, Engagements and Engagement Rate (Engagements divided by Impressions) for each tweet, both for paid and organic posts. Engagements include all activity on the tweet: retweets, follows, replies, favorites, and all clicks on the tweet, link, hashtag, avatar, etc.

Twitter_analytics_content_engagement

For a more granular view of the volume of each type of engagement, you can click on the specific tweet:

Twitter_Analytics_tweet_engagement_detail_(1)

Understanding which content items get the most engagement on Twitter is huge. If you can even commit 10 minutes a week to recording your top five or ten tweets by engagement so you can start seeing trends over time — and then applying those insights to future tweets — you’ll be able to better connect with your audience.

2) Understand How People Interact With Your Tweets Over Time

This is a really common question among social media marketers and brands: When is the best time for me to tweet?

Some tools can analyze your Twitter followers and recommend the best time for you to tweet. There’s also research out there showing when people are most likely to be active on Twitter. But of course, the best way to get to know your own audience is through your own account data.

In the Tweet Details view mentioned above, you can see the total number of impressions by the hour for the first 24 hours:

Twitter_Analytics_tweet_details_time_(1)

This feature will be even more powerful if Twitter adds the ability to see this data over custom ranges and for the lifetime of the tweet.

One of the things you’ll notice is that tweet engagement drops off ridiculously quickly as time passes. For example, for my account, half of the engagement happens within the first 2 hours, and the rest very slowly trickles in over a few days.

3) Get to Know Your Followers

Twitter’s audience data in the “Followers” tab contains a ton of valuable and useful insights. This is where you can really get to know the people who follow you.

You’ll find answers to questions like: Are your audience members more likely to be male or female? Which countries and cities are the majority from? What are their top interests? You can also see who your followers follow as well as your follower’s top five most unique interests. Answering these questions can help you better identify what content to create and share on Twitter — and when to share it. 

Twitter_analytics_follower_insights

In future upgrades, it would be awesome to see more demographic information, with the ability to drill down into data and even overlay demographics. That would really help social media marketers get a better handle on their different audience segments. Call that my Twitter Analytics wish list for Santa.

4) See Whether Your Follower Base Is Growing (or Shrinking)

I’d call myself a Twitter power user now, but it wasn’t always so. For several years, I slowly grew my following up to about 8,000 followers. In the past year that I’ve really focused on my Twitter presence, I’ve picked up another 24,000!

Now, Twitter allows you to track your follower growth. Twitter Analytics shows you how many followers you had on any given day with the interactive timeline pictured below. Hovering over various points on the timeline will show you the exact follow count on that day. It spans back to the day your account was started.

Twitter_analytics_follower_count

If you’re seeing blips in your follower count over time, it’s important to revisit your activity in those periods and see if you can learn from it. How often were you posting then — and what were you posting about? Were you taking time to reply to folks, too? Answering questions like these can help you explain these blips — and avoid the same mistakes in the future.

5) Determine If Your Twitter Ads Are Worth the Money

I’ve been experimenting recently with paid promotions on Twitter. After reviewing my own data in Twitter Analytics, I realized my ads weren’t as effective as I thought they would be.

In the Tweets tab, right at the top, there’s a chart that gives an overview of your paid and organic tweet performance. Like other Twitter Analytics charts, this one is interactive, so hovering over specific parts will show you more precise numbers, as in the example below. Keep in mind that the data only goes back 91 days, so take advantage of the ability to export it regularly. You can make comparisons over longer periods of time in another program.

Twitter_analytics_tweet_performance

I’m not spending a ton on paid promotions — around $100 a day when I use them — but at a glance, I can see that compared to organic posts, they’re not having a huge effect. If I were running specific promotions, I’d be interested in the Conversions information available in Twitter Analytics. But for getting more impressions on my content, it doesn’t seem worth it because I could get that exposure for free by just tweeting a few extra times per day.

Obviously, this will vary for every user, but this panel in Twitter Analytics is a pretty simply way to see what you need to make that decision.

Just below that chart, you can click “promoted” to see all of your paid promotions in chronological order. This shows you how many engagements and impressions each one earned, helping you pinpoint which paid promotions are working (and which ones aren’t).

Exporting Data: How to Discover Even More Twitter Trends

Twitter Analytics is great as an interactive dashboard for accessing increasingly granular data about your Twitter account performance.

The most useful feature I’ve found is the ability to export data from the Twitter API as a CSV file. Even power users with a ton of account activity can fairly quickly export their Analytics data. 

To export your data, select the timeframe you’d like to use, and click the “Export Data” button in the top right corner of your Twitter Analytics Dashboard.

twitter_analytics_dashboard

You can then sort through your exported data using Excel in ways not possible within the platform itself. For example, I extracted the time of day of my last 2500 tweets and plotted the tweet engagement rate vs. time of day, as shown here:

time-of-day-vs-engagement-rate

What I found was that the engagement rate (i.e. the # of engagements / impressions) held steady (on average) regardless of the time of day — possibly because I have a ton of international followers. It got me thinking that I really ought to be scheduling my content for all hours of the day, not just during business hours in my local time zone. Sure, fewer people will see my updates at 2 a.m. local time, but those who do are just as likely to engage with the content as those who see it during business hours.

There are so many other columns of data in the CSV export, including number of favorites, retweets, link clicks, replies, URL clicks, follows, etc. So you can do this kind of customized analysis on whatever metrics you care most about.

Ultimately, the best data is your own, so make time to check out Twitter Analytics and see what you can learn and do with it. Figure out which tweets resonate and why. Then, work those insights into your social media marketing strategy for a more successful way forward.

how to get 1000+ twitter followers

Dec

11

2014

Facebook Launches Call-to-Action Buttons on Business Pages

facebook-calls-to-action

Great news, marketers: Facebook just announced a feature that can help drive more traffic from your Facebook Page to your website: a call-to-action button.

While this feature isn’t available to everyone just yet, it’ll roll out in the U.S. over the next few weeks and worldwide starting in 2015. So if you don’t see it on your Page yet, rest assured that it’s coming. In the meantime, you can catch up on all the feature’s details in this post.

Here’s How a Facebook Page Call-to-Action Works

Page admins can choose one CTA button from a group of seven pre-made options — “Sign Up,” “Shop Now,” “Contact Us,” “Book Now,” “Use App,” “Watch Video,” and “Play Game” — and link it to “any destination on or off Facebook that aligns with a business’s goals,” according to the official announcement. According to Venturebeat‘s conversation with a Facebook spokeswoman, Facebook will monitor these links in the same way they monitor current links — and users can report Pages with malicious links, too. The CTA will show up at a fixed location: the top of your business Page, to the left of the Like button.

dollar-shave-club-cta

The location of the CTA button makes your cover photo all the more important. Be sure the color and design of your photo isn’t making the button less visible to Facebook Fans who aren’t accustomed to seeing it there. At the time of publishing, the CTA buttons don’t yet appear on the mobile app — so note that it might be confusing to mobile users if you integrate the cover photo design with the new CTA.

Want to see what it looks like while you’re waiting for this feature for your Page? Head on over to online retailer Dollar Shave Club’s Facebook Page — they were given beta access to the new feature and chose to place a “Sign Up” button linking to their home page. After a three-week test in beta, Dollar Shave Club’s director of acquisition Brian Kim reported a boost in customer acquisition efforts as a result of the CTA. He told Facebook, “Over the course of a three-week test, the Sign Up call-to-action button delivered a 2.5x higher conversion rate versus other comparable social placements aimed to drive new user acquisition.”

Keep checking back on your Facebook Page so you can take advantage of this feature as soon as it becomes available to you.

attract customers facebook

Dec

9

2014

9 Ways Interior Designers Can Reach New Clients Using Houzz

houzz

Houzz (“howzz”) is the place over 20 million people find and save beautiful home and garden photos, compiling the features, styles, colors, and patterns they want to create their perfect home.

That platform is truly a social network with huge sales potential, in that it allows users to collaborate with friends and family as well as other users – including the professionals who design, install, and sell the elements that go into their dream homes. When they’re ready to turn that dream into reality, they can then search designers or contractors in their local areas – or right in the idea-books they’ve been creating all along.

Who Should Use Houzz for Marketing?

Any company offering home and property design, build, repair, improvements or products should carefully consider adding Houzz to their marketing strategies. Especially hot are bathroom and kitchen-related products and services.

Some other somewhat surprising categories show up when you sign up for Houzz pro account, and it’s not hard to see how you might use Houzz for those, too. Some of the options include:

  • Home stagers
  • Home and outdoor media
  • Lawn and sprinkler companies
  • Photographers
  • Realtors
  • Design schools and organizations
  • Solar Energy
  • Environmental services and restoration.

Why Use Houzz Marketing?

Business is Booming

According to the 2013 Houzz and Home report, 48% of homeowners surveyed are planning to remodel or build an addition or custom home within the next two years. A full 84% said they plan to decorate or redecorate. And any homeowner will tell you that plan or no plan, there is a constant need for maintenance and repairs.

Decision-Making Has Moved Online

We know this – people search online for everything, and reviews are becoming more and more important in the decision-making process. Houzz allows you to showcase projects, reviews, and conversations that help homeowners choose you for their project.

Houzz Helps with SEO

Categories and profiles are indexed by Google. Go ahead and try a search for something like bathroom vanity ideas. Wouldn’t you like some of that exposure?

How to Make Sure People Find You on Houzz

Factors That Influence Your Ranking and Success Within Houzz:

  • A large number of quality photos (make sure your projects have at least five images each).
  • Popular, relevant keywords
  • Lots of good reviews (at least three!)
  • Plenty of detail in the description of your images
  • Adding a Houzz badge to your site
  • Staying involved – recent activity boosts your rankings.

More specifically, here are some practices that will help new customers discover you:

1) Utilize Keywords

Homeowners will find your profile, your projects, idea-books and images by searching keywords. So, do your keyword research and spend plenty of time writing great descriptions for everything you add to Houzz.

2) Submit Your Projects and Get Featured

Free advertising? Yes, please? Submit your best projects to editors and see your exposure and traffic soar. Budget-friendly projects for small to medium-sized homes are much sought-after, so if that sounds like you, check out all the guidelines and send your project in!

3) Be Social

Community interaction greatly increases your exposure on Houzz. Not just because Houzz favors active profiles, but because it increases your chances of getting found incidentally by users.

One way to stay active socially is to follow others. Look for complimentary businesses in your local area, or competitors outside your local area. You never know what networking opportunities may arise!

4) Engage with Direct Questions

Houzz users can post questions on any of your images or on your profile. Make sure you keep an eye open for them and answer them promptly! Oftentimes, people ask questions regarding things like what color paint you used, how large the garden is, or where to buy that fabulous sofa, etc.

Even if answering the question is unlikely to result in a direct sale for you, answer it anyway! People looking at your profile and photos will see if you are helpful and courteous – or just looking to make a sale.

5) Answer Questions Asked of Other Pros

As with other social networks, there are business owners who simply don’t answer questions asked by their fans. Puzzling, right? Well, if you see unanswered questions – those that have been waiting for a few days or more, go ahead and answer (jumping in on someone else’s question before they have a chance to respond is kind of rude).

Of, if you can expand on an answer, feel free. To find places where you might helpfully step in, search photos for your area of expertise and see which questions you might answer.

6) Work the Discussions

Homeowners and others as questions when they have a particularly tough design dilemma, or if they want some feedback on design options. Browse until you find one that looks interesting to you. When you respond you can include a link to one of your images – so if, for instance, you wanted to suggest a bright red accent tile that you sell, you could link to the photo in your answer.

houzz1

Don’t worry about only participating in discussions that are within your service area. The beauty of Houzz is that people from all over will see your answer, so even if the original poster isn’t near you, someone else who stumbles up on it may be!

You can also create your own discussions. Everyone loves a makeover – so showcase yours in a discussion!

7) Start a Poll

Ask a question to find out what your customers want and what are their challenges and priorities and give people a chance to see your products or the results of your services.

houzz2

8) Start a Pro-to-Pro Discussion

Looking to make connections with other professionals on Houzz? This is the place to connect, ask for help and opinions and collaborate freely – non-professional users are not able to see these discussions.

9) Use Idea-books

You can use ideabooks to showcase your style, even if you haven’t actually done that type of work yourself – yet. Don’t worry about advertising for the competition. If you’re in a service industry, being local is key. If you’re selling products, you should have your own great images to share.

You can create ideabooks to share color schemes, concepts and other ideas with clients. Make the ebook private and invite only your client to collaborate when you’re ready for them to see. They can then comment on your images – allowing for real-time feedback and project planning.

Do you create helpful ebooks? Only Houzz contributors can post actual stories and guides, but you can make your own unofficial guides by creating a public idea book with beautiful images and descriptive text.

If you’d like more details about Houzz, how homeowners are using it, how to set up profiles, projects and how to engage on Houzz, please download our new 54-page ebook, ‘Houzz Marketing A to Zz.

New Call-to-action

 

Dec

5

2014

The History of Hashtags [Infographic]

hashtag-blackboard

A lot’s happened since hashtags were first proposed on Twitter. Back then, the first generation iPhone was only a few months old. Superbad made a killing in theatres. J.K. Rowling released the seventh, final, and (arguably) most satisfying book of the Harry Potter series.

It took two years for Twitter to fully embrace the hashtag, and it’s been a whirlwind of opportunity and embarrassment for both users and marketers ever since. Just look at this post on successes and failures from seven big brands’ Twitter hashtag campaigns to see what I mean.

While its adoption on Twitter certainly wasn’t its conception, it’s interesting to look at the hashtag’s journey from 2007 to the recent past. Where along the way did it make the biggest difference in the world as we know it? Check out the infographic below from Offerpop for the timeline.

history-of-hashtags

how to get 1000+ twitter followers

Dec

5

2014

12 Clever Ways to Use More Visuals on Social Media

visual-content-tips-1

If there is one thing you should try to do to increase the impact of your social media, it’s adding visual marketing to your posts. At the simplest level, that means that every post should contain a graphic or video. While that sounds like a lot of work, it can have a huge payoff — this tactic has helped us double the impact of our posts. 

For most marketers just getting started with visual content creation, putting visuals in every single post feels near impossible. That’s where this post comes in — the purpose of this article is to explain the best (and often easiest) tips for adding visuals to your social media posts.  

1) Maximize Twitter’s Images

Some people still think that tweets are merely 140 characters of text. They are wrong — Twitter is a powerful visual-marketing platform too. In fact, one of our A/B tests found that tweets with images get 55% more leads. 

There are several ways to maximize your Twitter content with visuals. First, you can add an image to your tweets. This alone might double the impact of your tweets. 

Second, you can add up to four images to a tweet, so why stop at one. This is a great way to showcase an event or to tell a story that would be difficult with one picture. Here’s an example of a tweet with four images that received some good retweets and favorites. 

Third, you can also embed your tweets into blog posts like this and get more tweets and favorites. The above images are interactive within this post because they’re embedded tweets.

2) Embrace Pinterest

If you’re trying to cultivate an audience on Pinterest or you already have one there, every blog post needs an image that readers can “pin” to Pinterest. The ideal size for Pinterest images is 735 pixels x 1102 pixels for a vertical image or 735 pixels by 735 pixels for a square image. 735 pixels is the maximum width of a Pinterest post and 1102 pixels is the perfect length for an image — anything longer is truncated with a “read more” link.

Also, when you create a Pinterest image, you can embed the pin in the blog post so your readers can repin your perfectly formatted pin.

3) Make Photo Albums

Going beyond a single graphic or up to four on Twitter, you can create albums on Facebook and Google+ that can contain hundreds of photos. These albums are perfect for large events such as conferences and parties. The more pictures you post, the more likely people will see themselves or someone they recognize. This, in turn, increases the likelihood of them commenting and re-sharing the pictures with others. 

4) Use Flipagrams

Much as we love albums as a way to get organized, we’ve seen that few people will click through an entire collection. You could break albums into smaller collections, but that probably won’t get much more viewership.

One solution to this problem is Flipagram — it’s a fun app that you can use to create videos from still photos and share on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Instagram. It’s available for iOS, Android, and Windows.

On Flipagram, there’s a host of free thirty-second audio clips to add music to your videos, or you can add music from your own library. Peg used Flipagram to record a trip to a client’s retail location, Rent the Runway in Las Vegas. As an alternative to a photo album, which might not get many views, this slideshow of pictures was created with the images in her phone’s camera roll.

A visit to @KreusslerInc client @RenttheRunway at their Las Vegas retail location. #vegas #fashion

A video posted by Peg

Sep

23

2014

How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Social Selling

person-and-dogThis post originally appeared on the Sales section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to Sales.

For a person not in sales, unless they’re looking for a new job or they publish a lot of public-facing content, it’s not the end of the world if their LinkedIn profile isn’t 100% perfect. (more…)

Sep

8

2014

How to Write the Perfect LinkedIn Invitation [Template]

Published by in category HubSpot InBound Marketing Blog Feed, Social Meda | Comments are closed

envelope-letter-invitationImagine you’re at a networking event. You’re milling around and meeting people, cheese cube plate hand, when you spot someone across the room. Oh! Is that the woman who wrote that awesome article in Business Insider? You walk up to her, extend your hand, and say (drum roll please):

“I’d like to add you to my professional network.”

(more…)


Below are Sister sites of the Site you are on Powered by: MCC Group
Advertising Pages Exchange StudioFortunes TE Business Directory Free Classifieds